Ben Lustenhouwer: His Views On Oil Painting Portraiture

Advanced, Experts, Oils, Painting | 11 Oct, 2012

Ben Lustenhouwer was born in Soest, The Netherlands in 1951. He is a dutch portrait painter and has been praised for his abilities to capture the liveliness of expression within his models.

He was trained in the tradition of the Dutch masters and so continued this excellence into his own paintings to create some absolutely stunning portraiture. He places heavy emphasis on not over complicating his paintings with the likes of overly powerful directional light and instead prefers to work from a photo as that is a split second in time where that person has cherished.

This is an enlightening look into an influential European artist and his refreshing outlook on life is nothing short of inspirational. I thoroughly enjoyed this short video and it opened my eyes to how all artists have their own personalised account on how to create their works of art.

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    1. “Elke vlek op de juiste plek”, hoor ik ook van mijn leraar, maar dat vind ik meteen het moeilijkste van schilderen.Dank voor deze mooie en inspirerende les.Dat klinkt ook nog eens veel mooier! Dank je voor je vriendelijke woorden.

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    2. Thank you Mr. Lustenhower. Fantastic lesson. I’m an artist of many years and still learning. Interesting to learn from your experiences among different people in different countries. And your portraits! Wow!! I have been commissioned here in East Africa severally for paintings but if I paint like you, I will always have work. Will improve. I am self-taught and my problem has been to apply the right colour in the right place as you said – but also to do it without fear. Cheers!!

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    3. Thank you Mr. Lustenhouwer. Fantastic lesson. I’m an artist of many years and still learning. Interesting to learn from your experiences among different people in different countries. And your portraits! Wow!! I have been commissioned here in East Africa severally for paintings but if I paint like you, I will always have work. Will improve. I am self-taught and my problem has been to apply the right colour in the right place as you said – but also to do it without fear. Thanks. BenBen

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    4. Wauw..- I’d love to paint more, but i have to stick with digital painting for now.. Being only 17, i make money from those. Not alot, but it’s money after all.When i’m done paying of the dept i have for my parents (vetbills for my dog), i’m definitely gonna try out some traditional painting! 😀 You’re very inspiring, Mr. Lustenhouwer! ^^ Thanks for sharing your awesome videoes :3 If you wanna see me paint a portrait, i do have a video up, but only if you’re curious, lol.

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    5. Hey, I’m a girl from Germany and I really enjoy drawing. Sometimes I’m afraid of my paintings, but when I look your videos I’m full of inspiration and I only want to draw! Thank you very much for this! You are a great painter and a very wise man :)))

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    6. Your talent is clear, that should go without saying. But what interested me most were your comments . . . . art school in the Seventies, the differences between modern Dutch and Spanish portraiture, for example . . . and your view of yourself as a craftsman rather than an “artist”. You’re an interesting man, Mr. Lustenhouwer, as well as a fine painter.

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    7. ha ha, yeah, like all of those photoshop paintings that look like airbrush… Future of painting if you want it to look like something that should be painted on the side of a van. There’s nothing that can ever replace the tactile visceral feeling of a real oil painting on canvas.

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    8. Great Mr. Ben! It is indeed heartening to see your wonderful control over oil paints keeping them fresh and clean! Also happy to find someone painting from photographs, unlike the purists who abhor the idea of using photos! Tell me one thing,do you use tracing papers or enlargers etc. for the initial outlines as I do? Warm Regards, c.s. pant

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    9. what beautiful work you do, I am struggling changing from acrylic to oil, I find it very challenging but feel I need to advance to oil to have more control of my work. your video just confirmed that for me…portrait perfection.warmest regards, Jean

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    10. I don’t precisely like your paintings, because they don’t have the “zist”! They don’t have the “soul” that is needed in the presentation of paintings; having not to find the “aesthetics” in your painting, and they look like those paintings that are produced in Belgium and Holland by old people who go to the academy, thinking, what they learn is “good enough”, but they remain a “crafts people” wishing to be lined with masters, having to paint from a photo, with no life!

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