Zimou Tan: Live 150 Mins Video Of Artist Painting

Acrylics, Experts, Featured, Oils, Painting | 09 Oct, 2012

This is a live unedited sped up video of artist Zimou Tan painting. The painting is of young male and in my humble opinion I think it is absolutely beautiful. his technique is very block-like with his application but as the video goes on you begin to see how he applies the details with the smaller paint brushes. The music is highly appropriate also which makes for a thoroughly enjoyable 8 minutes of master class oil painting. Sit back and enjoy.

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    1. @iiaart Wet-on-wet, or alla prima (Italian, meaning at first attempt), is a painting technique, used mostly in oil painting, in which layers of wet paint are applied to previous layers of wet paint. This technique requires a fast way of working, because the work has to be finished before the first layers have dried. It may also be referred to as ‘direct painting’ or the French term au premier coup (at first stroke).[1]

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    2. Wet-on-wet, or alla prima (Italian, meaning at first attempt), is a painting technique, used mostly in oil painting, in which layers of wet paint are applied to previous layers of wet paint. This technique requires a fast way of working, because the work has to be finished before the first layers have dried. It may also be referred to as ‘direct painting’ or the French term au premier coup (at first stroke).[1]

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    3. @iiaart Wet-on-wet painting goes right back to the origins of oil painting, and was used by several of the best Early Netherlandish painters in parts of their pictures, such as Jan van Eyck in the Arnolfini portrait, and Rogier van der Weyden.[2] In traditional painting methods new layers were applied to most parts of a painting only after allowing the previous layer to completely dry. This drying process could vary from several days to several weeks, depending on the thickness of the layer.

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    4. Wet-on-wet painting goes right back to the origins of oil painting, and was used by several of the best Early Netherlandish painters in parts of their pictures, such as Jan van Eyck in the Arnolfini portrait, and Rogier van der Weyden.[2] In traditional painting methods new layers were applied to most parts of a painting only after allowing the previous layer to completely dry. This drying process could vary from several days to several weeks, depending on the thickness of the layer.

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    5. @iiaart Since the mid-19th century the use of commercially produced pigments in portable tubes has facilitated rapid and on-the-spot painting. Impressionists like Claude Monet and Vincent van Gogh, realists like John Singer Sargent, Robert Henri and George Bellows, and the Abstract Expressionist Willem de Kooning have each in different ways exploited the potential for fluid energy in the application of oil paints.

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    6. Since the mid-19th century the use of commercially produced pigments in portable tubes has facilitated rapid and on-the-spot painting. Impressionists like Claude Monet and Vincent van Gogh, realists like John Singer Sargent, Robert Henri and George Bellows, and the Abstract Expressionist Willem de Kooning have each in different ways exploited the potential for fluid energy in the application of oil paints.

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    7. you have an incredible sense of color, form and style, really liked the timelapse. hopefully you could answer a few questions – i was curious to know what surface this was painted on, it seems similar your other portrait surfaces. also, are you still in art school? if so which one? thanks!!

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    8. No I didn’t screw up the nostrils, I was being true to the subject. Human faces are not perfectly balanced, you’ll find out if you take a picture with one side of your own face, and paste it reversed on the other side, you won’t see yourself as yourself.

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    9. there are other things that can be used instead of linseed oil that dry pretty quick – at my school, we use a quick-drying medium by Umton (I live in central Europe, not sure what stuff you can get at your place) – but when I look at the bottle, it sais it contains Turpentine, Damar Resin and Stand Oil…. ask in your art shop for an equivalent, my painting is dry in less than an hour using this. or add some Sicative in your paints. Hope this was of some help to you…

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    10. Have you ever thought about publishing an ebook or guest authoring on other websites? I have a blog centered on the same information you discuss and would love to have you share some stories/information. I know my readers would enjoy your work. If you’re even remotely interested, feel free to shoot me an e mail.

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    11. Yeah, I think I’m just going to give up painting. This video is incredible. You’re extremely talented, and I have realised that I’m simply too old to pick up any level of skill even approaching this. Thanks for such a great video. Your blending and modelling is superb.

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    12. That was really Amazing !! very impressive.. love to see these kind of works… the skin tone was excellent! can I ask what colors u have used to bring those beautiful n glowing skin tone?? thanks for sharing u have magic in your hands.. I just love it….

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    13. Thank you for your support. Once again, here is the colors I used for the palette. Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna, Cadmium Red, Cadmium Yellow, Limon Yellow, Viridian Green, French Ultramarine, Yellow Ochre, Titanium White, and Cerulean Blue.

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    14. Thank you for your support. Once again, here is the colors I used for the palette.

      Alizarin Crimson, Burnt Sienna, Cadmium Red, Cadmium Yellow, Limon Yellow, Viridian Green, French Ultramarine, Yellow Ochre, Titanium White, and Cerulean Blue.

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    15. I love so much watching your video demos…and thanks for sharing the colors in you palette…you are generous.

      Cit

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    16. I read an article a few in particular I liked your site very impressed. ?ok a site like yours is really good to write such a nice articles like this all the time to inform us. will bring you the best places in caring for ideas and culture. Thank you Best regards

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    17. There is a very nice site for a long time is going to come to this site if you are not very up to date I find I want to thank all of the

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    18. Yes enjoying this tutorial very much. Although it is sped up video I still somehow pick up some tips by watching it over and over again. Also it is very inspiring cuz it seems easy but of course quite hard when one is an amateur.

      Thank you for sharing your art.

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