Tips On Photographing Your Artwork

This video has been produced by a well recognised artist who has experienced all of the issues that the amateur artist faces when attempting to upload images of artwork to the internet. Many people photograph their work indoors but I favour the method shown here and do go outside to photograph my own artwork.

The presenter gives a comprehensive demonstration of the settings on his camera to allow the best image to be produced. He then takes you back into the studio and shows how to adjust your image on the PC prior to uploading to the web. It is always good practise to consider the problems encoutered by others in the same situation as your self and determine whether their experiences can be used to your own benefit. In this video I believe we are given a very good view of how best to present your own artwork to the web.

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    1. I liked your video. I have a Canon Powershot SX210. I was following along with your tutorial. I was surprised at how different the layouts and screen settings are in the two cameras. Thanks for your advice. It helps while shooting a dark-colored painting.

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    2. couldn’t help noticing the stress at the start transformed into having fun at the end, lol.thanks tim; even though i have a rather simple camera, there ΰre some adjustments i will make from now on, when taking pictures of paintings!

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    3. thank you tim, I have a canon but not as fancy as your’s but most canon camera’sdo have manual and I see the light settings. I never knew and now I can take my paintings pics and they won’t look so dark when showing family through emails.Great tip!!!

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    4. Tim, Thanks for your tips. I have taken pictures of my art and it was soooo off! Thanks! I have a question: Why do you take 2 pictures on each settings of white? I also wanted to know which one you chose? Of course is the one that most closely looks like the actual painting, but is there a reason for taking 2 pictures on each setting? Thanks!!! You are an awesome artist!!! I wish I was 1/10 of the artist you are!! πŸ™‚

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    5. I always take my pictures on RAW. Then I can easily fix the white balance afterwards plus it gives you the opportunity to do a lot of easy modifications in the raw converter (I use Photoshop’s own raw converter) while in the process of converting the image to jpg. Very quick and easy. I especially love giving images a slightly S-curve, which really makes colors and contrast pop. I also sharpen the picture a bit.

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    6. cont. When using raw, you can also fix the exposure some afterwards, if you should have a problem. I always use manual settings (manual or aperture priority/time priority, whichever suits me best at the time). I have a Canon 40D. For such images, I usually prefer using my 50mm/f1.8 lens (I have one of the old ones, the one which is better built and slightly sharper than the cheap one you get now, but that one too is quite a gem for the price!).

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    7. i want one of those camers! right now i just use a simple casio camera 7.2 megapixels i noticed a peice on the wall with the red looking sky id like to see more of that one πŸ˜€ im gonna purchase ur tutorials for sure i learned so much from you i love your work

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    8. i want one of those camers! right now i just use a simple casio camera 7.2 megapixels i noticed a peice on the wall with the red looking sky id like to see more of that one πŸ˜€ im gonna purchase ur tutorials for sure i learned so much from you i love your work

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    9. Great video, love your work. You should be using custom white balance and place a white sheet of paper in front og the painting to calibrate. When adjusting the light meter you should open the iris rather than change the shutter speed if possible.

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    10. When you are a painter by profession, an entry level DSLR camera would be the least of Tim’s costs. That Canon Rebel runs about seven bills, or about a month’s rent for a decent studio. While it’s a very nice camera, it’s not even a full-frame camera, like a Canon 5D, will run you about 2K.

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    11. Angle of shot was right but you probably could have been lower so that the center of the painting matched the center of your lens. Sides of painting will appear to diverge otherwise (won’t be straight) Tripods are your friends! πŸ™‚ Good advice otherwise, though

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    12. great so not only do i have to become a better painter, but i need to become a photographer and buy an imac, thats just dandy! thanks for the vid, one of these days i will photograph my painting without glare, by god i will

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    13. If you have indirect lighting, and something dark behind you like a wall, you shouldn’t have glare. You can take the actual photos with a decent compact camera if you know how to set it up properly, you don’t need a DLSR. Or get a second-hand DSLR on eBay. The Nikon D40 and Canon 400D are decent even though they’re older cameras now. As for the processing, you can use a free alternative to photoshop called GIMP (Gnu Image Manipulation Program). πŸ™‚

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    14. Oh, and a tripod helps avoid camera-shake if the light isn’t bright enough. You can get them cheaply too. You want the camera to be aimed as perpendicularly to the painting as possible (i.e. the line along which you point the camera is at a 90-degree angle to the painting). This avoids perspective distortions.

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