How To Use Winsor & Newton Liquin Mediums With Your Oils

This educational art tutorial contains a series of demonstrations with a resident artist showing the qualities of the Winsor and Newton Liquin range of mediums.

Traditionally mediums have been used to define oil paint itself over the years and improve its qualities, the most typical and common medium which is still largely used to this day is linseed oil and it extends the paints gloss and flow.

What the Liquin range does is retain these qualities but also increases the durability and flexibility but also makes the oil paints dry quicker. The mediums and their individual qualities like increasing viscosity, preserving opacity and richness are all displayed to you in this extremely informative video tutorial. The mediums featured are Liquin original, Liquin Light, Liquin Fine Detail and Liquin Impasto.

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    1. interesting video. thanks.by the way, mediums is fine as in plural. The ‘media’ plural is more commonly associated with plural verbs. This medium comes from the medical medium (noun) which can be media or mediums in plural. So he is right. Eg 2 psychic mediums. I don’t think that would work as a couple of psychic media!

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    2. I thought you were not supposed to use so much medium w the paint- Don’t you decrease it as you paint? You use 4 x more than i do w the same amount of paint- i am confused because I thought the ration was no more than a certain percentage with the paint?

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    3. Based on the fact that as soon as Liquin comes into contact with air it starts to dry/solidify. Therefore whilst mixing Liquin with a whole tube of colour is fine, we would not recommend storing it in a jar. This is based on the fact that the seal cannot be guaranteed and that the air gap inside the jar will start to make the mixture dry.

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    4. This means that whilst the body of the mixture will be fine the surface will be very prone to skinning. All of our mediums are designed to be used once mixed and not stored. I would recommend either making the mix and using it immediately or buying the required colour in Griffin Fast Drying Oil Colour.

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    5. I can rec buying Daler Rowney Alkyd gel. They fopped 3 tubes off for 50kr (like 4 quid) at home and I bought them all. The Alkyd Gel is the best thing ive bought and it works pretty much as a siccative, only cheaper. I also like Liquin a lot and today I know that its simple paint base (same as they used in the old oil paints for houses) its the smell. Liquin is a great product, but I doubt that it warrants a price of 6 quid for 250 ml…

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    6. Dammar is a varnish and and should not be used as mediums, this would make the painting sensitive to solvent. An attempt to clean it in the future may remove the painting instead! If you want your paint to dry fast why not use a fast drying medium instead? A Liquin Medium would be suitable here.

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    7. Should you have some left over you can try putting it in a jar and close it air tight, wrap a plastic bag around to help keep the air out and store it in a dark room, away from heat and sunlight. You can also put the jar in a container with a little bit of water covering the very bottom. This should help to prevent it from trying out.

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    8. Hi, thank you for your question. Yes, you can varnish your painting when it is fully dry (this can take 6-12 months) also if you have you used Liquin or any other medium. Do not use Liquin as varnish. The varnish’s purpose is to seal a painting to protect it from dust, light etc.

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