How To Photograph Your Artwork

There are so many opportunities to exhibit your own artwork on line and it is vitally important that you present your work in the best way possible. I have seen numerous poorly photographed paintings on the web and these pieces generate much less interest than work which has been photographed correctly. This video, produced by Sachi, clearly describes some of the key points to note when photographing your artwork.

You are given advice on how to position your work, how to adjust the lighting to suit and how to use the camera to best effect. The video explans many of the issues that commonly occur whilst photographing your work and demonstrates how incorrect settings on your camera or with the lighting can adversely affect the quality of your image. The presenter then goes on to provide a short introduction to the image adjusting tools generally availble on your PC and shows how to crop and adjust your image to provide the perfect upload. This is a very clear professionally produced video and well worth the time taken to view.

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    1. Hi Tyler, greetings from Iceland! This video is so awesome. I have been so ashamed to show photo’s of my paintings as the photography is so bad. I look forward to using the tips you gave here. I have just launched a global art project called Project 12, and will put this video in the instructions to help our members send in great photo’s of their work. We are asking people to make art or photos each month in the year 2012. Please see: 2012project 12 dot com

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    2. depends how big the flat object is. If it is a large canvas, for example, and the camera focuses in the centre, then the distance to the top or side edge will be further than the distance to the centre, so by increasing the depth of field will increase the sharpness towards the edge.The middle range of the fstop will usually be sharper than having the lens wide open, say f 2.8, or fully closed, say f22, and because of this, is often referred to as the sweet spot of the lens.

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